9/10! Frozen in Time reminds us that you can't get properly safe and cozy without awareness and experience of the storm outside. ”

Exclaim! Magazine

LINDY VOPNFJÖRÐ

LINDY VOPNFJORD ANNOUNCES NEW ALBUM 
YOU WILL KNOW WHEN IT’S RIGHT 

OUT MARCH 29 

FIRST SINGLE “LOVE ME LIKE THAT” OUT NOW 

New York, NY (February 4, 2019) – Icelandic-Canadian songwriter Lindy Vopnfjörd has announced his seventh full-length album, You Will Know When It’s Right, for a March 29 release, led by the single “Love Me Like That”, which dropped this past Friday – listen + share. 

You Will Know When It’s Right came into fruition after an invitation from legendary Icelandic songwriter Daníel Ágúst Haraldsson, leader of acclaimed electronic band Gus Gus, to team up and collaborate with Iceland’s most beloved band, Nydonsk.  The album was recorded at the famed Hljodriti Studio, and includes a live performance with Nydonsk at their concert at Eldborg Harpa in Reykjavik. 

Vopnfjörd is a proficient storyteller who distills human experience into the vital emotions that define a moment so crisply, and memorably.  From his West Coast, Victoria-based band Northern Junk to Toronto’s explosive indie rock group, Major Maker, that boasted a fervor comparable to The Killers or Hard-Fi, Lindy’s talents have spanned many musical outfits. From his earliest albums, The Humourous Years and Suspension of Disbeliefwhich he toured extensively through the UK, to his most recent, Young Waverer, Lindy has consistently delivered a caliber of songwriting and musical arrangement, that has garnered heaps of critical accolades. 

Born into the Icelandic community in Manitoba, Canada, Vopnfjörd started his music career early, singing traditional Icelandic songs with his family, helping shape this intuitive artist. By age four, Lindy was already pronouncing his “stand and care for the world” bent as an Icelandic-Canadian folk artist by singing cautionary songs against nuclear war. Traveling around by bus with his mom and dad and extended family, he developed an appreciation for performing as a form of sharing. Touring comes naturally to Lindy, and to see him live is to witness years of experience in honest delivery and authentic exchange with a dedication as real to a room of three, as when he’s performing to a stadium-full. 

Over the course of now seven albums, Lindy have mesmerized, delighted and moved audiences at house parties and bars to embassies, theatre halls, touring with Whitehorse, and playing large festivals, such as Osheaga, the Reykjavik Folk Festival, and Hillside Festival. 

Residing now in Toronto’s Parkdale neighbourhood, Vopnfjörd and his ongoing artistry are supported by an artistic family and solid fan base, and reflects the musical pedigree of the artistic community in which he is immersed. 

You Will Know When It’s Right Track Listing: 

01.  Love Me Like That 

02.  Standing On The Sea 

03.  Give Some Love 

04.  Our Greatest Irony 

05.  How Did We Get Away 

06.  Everlasting Odyssey 

07.  I’m So Hi 

08.  Lover Sister (Live In Reykjavik With Nydonsk) 

www.lindymusic.com 

www.instagram.com/lindyvopnfjord 

www.twitter.com/lvop 

www.facebook.com/lindymusic

SIRIUS XM'S NORTH AMERICANA #359 ADDS "LOVE ME LIKE THAT"

MARCH 7th, 2019

ADDS:
Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – For Real 
Reuben & The Dark – Hallelujah
Tedeschi Trucks Band – Hard Case
Wintersleep – Into the Shape of Your Heart 
Lindy Vopnfjörð – Love Me Like That
Vampire Weekend – Harmony Hall
John Mayer – I Guess I Just Feel Like

NEW SINGLE - LOVE ME LIKE THAT

Press links

Sainte-Marie, Cockburn on the return of the protest song and power of music

By  — Feb 2 2017FNG103386323.jpg - The Canadian Press - CP


TORONTO — Folk singer-songwriter Lindy Vopnfjord climbed into bed stunned on the night Donald Trump won the U.S. presidency, but he awoke the next morning feeling activated.

Bristling with an urge to speak out, the Icelandic-Canadian musician wrote a series of lyrics that might've seemed alarmist at the time.

And even two weeks ago, when he finally released "Darkness is the Day" to coincide with Trump's inauguration, some of the words didn't resonate quite as much as they do now.

"Opinion is king, one-plus-one is three. The loudest truth is the truest, so repeat after me," Vopnfjord sings. "It takes a little time to get the spin to unwind. It takes a little time."

Vopnfjord is stunned by the evolution of his song's significance.

"There's so much that keeps feeding into the lyrics," he says. "There was more to it than maybe even I realized."

He's just one of countless musicians using their voice to push against what they see as an alarming political climate. Over the past month, prominent artists have contributed a chorus of anti-Trump anthems, which started flowing out ahead of the election last November.

Tracks by Arcade Fire and Mavis Staples ("I Give You Power"), Fiona Apple ("Tiny Hands") and the Gorillaz ("Hallelujah Money") have stood out as recent highlights.

Before that, artists like Franz Ferdinand ("Demagogue"), Jimmy Eat World ("My Enemy") and Amy Mann ("Can't You Tell?") collaborated for "30 Days, 30 Songs," a project that counted down to election day in the hopes of drawing attention to Trump's potential power. The campaign recently expanded to 1,000 songs that will be revealed throughout Trump's presidency.

Listeners appear eager to hear more protest songs too.

Several anti-Trump anthems became viral hits last year, including Ledinsky's "Donald Trump Makes Me Wanna Smoke Crack" and YG & Nipsey Hussle's "FDT," a rousing rap track which pairs an expletive with the president's initials.

All of this newfound inspiration has longtime social-activist musician Buffy Sainte-Marie a bit suspicious. She questions why some artists only decided to write protest songs when there's "going to be money" in it.

But she's also not against more people speaking out.

"The art of the two-and-a-half minute song — it's such a powerful tool," she says.

"If you can say something in three minutes that somebody else had to write a 400-page book about, the book is going to be shelved. The song can live forever."

Sainte-Marie says she writes her songs with the mindset of a photographer capturing snapshots of history.

Her 1964 protest anthem "Universal Soldier" was a portrait of the Vietnam War era while "Now That the Buffalo's Gone" tackled the centuries-old plight of indigenous communities that still continues today.

She wrote "Universal Soldier" as if she was a student crafting an essay for a hypothetical professor who didn't see eye-to-eye with her perspective.

"I was determined to get an 'A-plus' out of this guy," she says.

"(I was) deliberately trying to give people a different point of view than they may have come across before."

Fellow activist songwriter Bruce Cockburn is cautious when it comes to deciding how to express his opinions through music. 

With a career spanning nearly 40 years, he's found himself inspired by causes like the environment ("If a Tree Falls") and the devastation of war ("If I Had a Rocket Launcher"). But so far, the U.S. election hasn't motivated him to write anything pointed, and he says it might not.

He says he doesn't want to veer into territory where he's just spouting his political views against a backdrop of bad music.

"It's not always obvious to put it in a song that (doesn't simply become) a propaganda diatribe," says Cockburn, who will receive the People's Voice Award at the Folk Alliance International awards show in Kansas City, Mo., this month in recognition of his social and political commentary.

So many political songs just capitalize on anger, he argues, but don't have any artistic merit. He points to 1965's "Eve of Destruction," a song recorded by Barry McGuire that topped the Billboard charts, as one example of a misfire.

"It was a huge hit, but a terrible song," he says.

Cockburn suggests the track was too literal and sounds especially dated now. Many protest songs that attack their subject head-on suffer the same fate of becoming irrelevant, he adds.

Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind" stands as a far superior example, he suggests, or "We Shall Overcome," which began as a hymn in the early 1900s and evolved into an anthem of the civil rights movement.

"It had tremendous application over the years to any number of causes," he says of the latter.

"It's absolutely timeless."

 

Follow @dfriend on Twitter.

David Friend, The Canadian Press

 





Toronto musicians to watch in 2017: folk and country edition

BY 



Lindy Vopnfjörð

You may remember Lindy Vopnfjörð as just Lindy, the name he went by until 2013’s independently released Young Waverer. So you can file Vopnfjörð under “ones to watch again.” The Icelandic-Canadian songwriter’s stellar (literally often about stars) sixth album, Frozen In Time, came out quietly in late October. He’s throwing a belated launch party for the record – a stark, dark, torchy, autumnal and wintry meditation – this week.

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